RSS

This Website is about Raw Honey, Bee Pollen, Swarm Removal, Beekeeping Consulting, Hive Management Contracting, and Sponsor A Bee Hive in Washington, Pacific Northwest

June 1st, 2014 | No Comments

To get an overview click about or scroll down to the bottom of this page.


Swarm Removal Service for Yelm, Rainier, Roy, Tenino WA, near Olympia, Lacey in Washington

June 1st, 2014 | No Comments

Honey Bee Swarm Removal
Bee Forever Apiary collects honeybee swarms on your property for free if it is openly and easily accessible. However, extracting an established bee colony out of a building is not free. Minimum charge is $50 which includes the first hour of traveling and work. Every additional hour costs $25.00.
Please indicate your exact address, where and how the swarm has settled or is hanging, how high it is and whether you provide a ladder long enough or not. With our ladders we only collect swarms up to 25 feet maximum height
We will contact you as soon as possible to make arrangements.


Local, Raw & Rare Maple Honey from Yelm WA, near Olympia, Lacey in Washington

November 19th, 2013 | 2 Comments

Our Raw Maple Honey, a Sensational Rarity in the Pacific Northwest
Bee Forever Apiary operates in the Bald Hills near Yelm, WA. A Maple nectar flow is a rare event in our rural and unpolluted area. The last time our bees harvested a surplus was in 2003…Three factors need to be subtly orchestrated: the blooming stage of the maple tree, the weather conditions with frost and not too much precipitation, and the colony strength of the bee hives. In April 2013, 6 of our hives were ready to collect the nectar and fill the honey supers. The result is a honey of light golden greenish color, very aromatic and with a special delicious taste. You will not forget this honey! Maple Honey, made by the honey bees from nectar out of the Maple blossoms, is not to be confused with Maple syrup, man-made from the sap by cutting through the bark.

Our honey is raw, pure and unprocessed from the wildflowers around us. What does that mean?
1) No heating is applied during the extraction and bottling process and therefore, all the valuable ingredients like enzymes remain intact.
2) Our honey is only strained but not filtered or ultra filtered which would remove small particles like pollen. The pollen content of a honey is like the fingerprint of humans. Pollen analysis of honey reveals its origin. Ultra filtered honey loses its “fingerprint” opening the door widely for cheating or adulterating the honey.
3) Our raw honey is NOT diluted with water or corn syrup. The water content is below 18%, so the honey can be stored for a long period of time in a cool, dry and dark place. Eventually our honey will crystallize into a fine creamy texture that maintains its full quality. If you prefer the honey to be liquid simply heat the jar in a water bath with max. temperature of 105 F.

1 pint glass jar contains 1.5 lbs of honey. Price $18.00.

Order through email at bee4ever@fairpoint.net or call (360)894-6038. Shipping available.

More general information about honey see this page: Honey Info


Local Bee Pollen from the Bald Hills in Yelm WA , near Olympia, Lacey in Washington

October 29th, 2013 | No Comments

Bee Forever Apiary Bee Pollen Label

Bee Forever Apiary Bee Pollen Label


Our Air-dried Bee Pollen
Bee Pollen from the Bald Hills area are delicious. Rich in proteins, essential amino acids, vitamins, and trace minerals, bee pollen is a very valuable food supplement. Our pollen is harvested from our hives right here in the Bald Hills, a rural and unpolluted area. Every flower has its distinct pollen color and characteristics. The more variety in colors the more valuable the pollen is. Keep the pollen in the freezer or the fridge if it is not consumed rapidly. We offer the pollen in glass pint jar, ziplock bag, or for long term storage vacuum packed.

1 Glass Pint Jar with 10 oz of bee pollen. Price $14.00
1 Ziploc bag contains 1 lb of bee pollen. Price $19.00
vacuum packed: 1 lb of bee pollen. Price $20.00

Order through email at bee4ever@fairpoint.net or call (360)894-6038

For more information about bee pollen see this page:Pollen Info


Local Raw Wildflower Honey from the Bald Hills in Yelm WA, near Olympia, Lacey in Washington

October 20th, 2013 | 1 Comment

Bee Forever Apiary Honey lLbel

Bee Forever Apiary Honey Label


Our Raw Wildflower Honey
Bee Forever Apiary operates in the Bald Hill area near Yelm, WA. This area is very rural and unpolluted.
Our honey is raw, pure and unprocessed from the wildflowers in our area. What does that mean?
1) No heating is applied during the extraction and bottling process and therefore, all the valuable ingredients like enzymes remain intact.
2) Our honey is only strained but not filtered or ultra filtered which would remove small particles like pollen. The pollen content of a honey is like the fingerprint of humans. Pollen analysis of honey reveals its origin. Ultra filtered honey loses its “fingerprint” opening the door widely for cheating or adulterating the honey.
3) Our raw honey is NOT diluted with water or corn syrup. The water content is below 17%, so the honey can be stored for a long period of time in a cool, dry and dark place. Eventually our honey will crystallize into a fine creamy texture that maintains its full quality. If you prefer the honey to be liquid simply heat the jar in a water bath with max. temperature of 110F.

1 quart glass jar contains 3 lbs of honey. Price $22.00
1 pint glass jar contains 1.5 lbs of honey. Price $14.00

Order through email at bee4ever@fairpoint.net or call (360)894-6038. Shipping available. However, for packaging reasons we only ship pint jars.

More general information about honey see this page: Honey Info


Our Raw Wildflower Honey is now available at the Yelm Food Co-op in Yelm, WA near Olympia, Lacey in Washington

September 18th, 2013 | No Comments

Take advantage of the central location of the Yelm Food Coop (308 Yelm Ave E, Yelm, WA 98597) to purchase our delicious raw and unprocessed Wildflower Honey. The honey is available in pint jars (1.5 lbs).


The End of My Warre Beekeeping Experience

December 6th, 2011 | No Comments

The Warre hive that I started in summer 2010 with a swarm from my apiary got well through the winter but became weaker towards the end of summer 2011. I combined it in Sep. 2011 with the other Warre hive that I started in Spring 2011 with a 3lb package. However, the combined hive was totally destroyed by a black bear Nov 30, 2011. Since then I have not started another Warre hive.


More Learnings from Warre Beekeeping

March 10th, 2011 | No Comments

6) The mosquito screen is not suitable for the quilt. Ants, earwigs and the bees chewed throughg it very quickly. A fine hardware cloth is doing a better job.
7) Mice or some othe criters totally dismantled the glassfiber insulation pad in the roof. The only thing left was the paper. Therefore, all openings in the roof were secured with a piece of hardware cloth after renewing the pad.
8.) In fall/winter the shavings became pretty wet after a while. The board from the roof that sits on top of the quilt was also very wet. The roof and the shavings needed to be exchanged twice so far.
9) It is advisable to have an extra burlap cover before putting on the quilt. The quilt can be removed much easier.
10) My bees were very reluctant to move downwards into the second box. Only after providing some pieces of wax combs they started bulding and filling the second box. The same thing happened with the third box. However, some of the comb pieces fell off and it was getting late in summer so the third box remained basically untouched.


My First Learnings with the Warre Hive

July 5th, 2010 | No Comments

1) Before introducing a package or a swarm into one box it is beneficial to have marked the position of the top bars if they are not nailed in place. With all the bees crawling around and mainly upwards it was not easy to put the top bars in the appropriate position. I chose not to nail them in order to make room for the bees to drop on the bottom board.
2) When a swarm or a package is introduced in two boxes I will nail the top bars of the lower (2nd) box in future. The dropping bees totally misplaced all of the topbars of the lower box.
3) The main amount of moisture of the hive does not originate from the sugar syrup. Condensation water was formed above the quilt and was dropping back on the quilt whether the hive was fed or not. I saw straw get moldy in the quilt after 14 days only. However, no mold was found in a quilt filled with (fir)wood shavings although the top half inch was wet.
4) The most effective measure to minimize condensation water is to insulate the board that sits on the quilt. This board is part of the roof so the insulation goes between this board and the rooof boards. Since I put the insulation (I used a glass fiber patch with paper towards the quilt) the shavings are considarable less moist if moist at all.
5) My standard hive stand are two H-cement blocks (8×8x16″). Willie had the glorious idea to set the blocks so far appart that the hive sits on the inside edges of the blocks only. That leaves a big space underneath the hive to introduce a bigger mirror for observation.


My Warre finally got started!

June 18th, 2010 | No Comments

Last week it finally happened. I caught my first swarm from one of my hives. It was extremely easy: the bees just crawled up the wall and clustered underneath the roof. I collected them in my swarm box and introduced them into the Warre hive with two boxes.
Swarms are notorious for fast build up so lets see how long it takes them to fill the first two boxes… At a clients apiary I have seen that a swarm had built as much combs in two week what the package bees took seven weeks to build.